Overview Of Evaluation Projects

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Last Updated on May 24, 2021 by

Evaluation of Integrated Services for Co-Occurring Disorders Patients

Better results relating to Co-occurring Disorders and drug use issues have been provided accurately by Foundations Associates and DDM over the last ten years. A growing body of research reporting the effectiveness and effect of comprehensive treatment programs for co-occurring disorders has emerged consistently.


Furthermore, our evaluation studies have consistently shown that integrated treatment services have a positive impact on important results such as; substance abuse, psychological disorders, functioning, earnings and employment, housing stability, involvement in criminal justice, high-risk behaviors, and utilization of service measures (reduced overnight inpatient and emergency room while increasing participation in less costly community-based treatment services). Similar gains have been recorded in our assessment studies across subgroups of co-occurring disorders and populations with special needs. It is important to understand that the significance of integrated treatment services and the efficacy of Foundations Associates’ services, which were built based on the integrated treatment concepts devised by Robert Drake and Kim Mueser, are reflected in the results of this research study.

Integrated Residential Care Facilities Extension

FROM 1998 TO 2001, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT. TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES PARTNERSHIP

Using state-of-the-art residential facilities, Tidesmakers Associates was able to expand the range of services that they provide to the residents by adding additional housing capabilities for both women and men. Eventually, the men’s programs were expanded across the nation so that a model of comparable comprehensive residential community was able to be developed specifically to meet the needs of the women with dual diagnoses.

An Integrated Community-Based Service Model Being Established.

FROM 2001 TO 2004, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT. IN COLLABORATION WITH THE NASHVILLE METROPOLITAN HEALTH DEPARTMENT.

For persons with dual diagnoses who have access to these types of extended-term multidisciplinary outpatient services in the community, this project will further expand that reach. We believe that if a facility is set up to provide continuous follow-up for community-based service recipients, the probability of following up long-term would be increased. A community-based treatment program based on a relatively effective residential program was developed to develop a more affordable and resource-effective dual diagnosis care model that would still achieve comparable outcomes to the experimental and licensed model.

Evaluation of The Act Model for Homeless Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders

FROM 2001 TO 2004, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT.

In addition to the ACT model for people with severe and chronic mental illness, the project incorporates key practices that have been empirically shown to be effective in active comprehensive treatment programs (Drake et al., 2001). The project aims to develop, adapt and create a model that can be replicated for treating and supporting a community of customers who are unable to obtain and sustain stable housing due to co-morbid drug abuse, dependency and mental issues.

An Integrated Drug Court Model Being Evaluated.

FROM 2001 TO 2004, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT. PARTNERSHIP WITH DAVIDSON COUNTY COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS PROGRAM. 

Several non-violent, dual-diagnosed felony offenders are enrolled in the program, and they are provided diversionary residential treatment. There are, therefore, a lot of ethical issues to be addressed. This approach is based on comprehensive, integrated clinical practice, while the primary treatment is based upon drug court principles. As a result of this initiative, which builds on the experience of a highly effective integrated services agency, the combined resources of two leading organizations have been put together to provide a recovery option for a rapidly increasing and underserved population of people who otherwise would be imprisoned.

Criminal Offenders with Co-occurring Disorders and Drug Use Disorders: A Diversionary Model

FROM 2003 TO 2007, HHS/SAMHSA/CMHS FUNDED THE PROJECT. COLLABORATION WITH THE GOVERNMENT OF SHELBY COUNTY.

As part of this initiative, Shelby County is building on recent efforts by county officials to address one of the county’s most pressing infrastructure needs: jail diversion for people who have co-occurring disorders, including substance abuse. Our model incorporates evidence-based approaches from the Council of State Governments and Robert Drake. They have both written books on prison diversion programs, dual diagnosis programs, and mental health counselling services.

Expansion of a Multi-Diagnosis Treatment Program: An Integrated Rehabilitation Intervention Model for Ex-Offenders with Mental Illness, Addictive Disorders, and HIV Seropositive or High-Risk Status

FROM 2004 TO 2009, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT.

With this project, established co-occurring disorder and HIV/AIDS services providers in Memphis come together to solve the city’s most urgent infrastructure need: care for ex-offenders with complex co-occurring disorders, drug-abuse disorders, and severe mental illness, like schizophrenia. Integrated Recovery Management uses a combination of evidence-based approaches from NIDA, Drake, the CDC, SAMHSA to establish a robust, integrated recovery management model. The model integrates SA/MI treatment and HIV prevention/care in a cohesive, integrated recovery management model.

Treatment and Services for Shelby County Detainees with Co-occurring Disorders Being Expanded.

FROM 2004 TO 2007, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT.

A previous rehabilitation program has been established to complement a current initiative to provide more comprehensive recovery services, including residential rehab and long-term case management. The more comprehensive drug use history of an individual, in addition to a complete set of clinical symptoms, will benefit from these more comprehensive treatment offerings, which are designed to promote the diversion of abuse and increase the availability of evidence-based treatment options.
Our research activities have led to the development and distribution of appropriate comprehensive treatment services and expanded access to community-based facilities in collaboration with other organizations and the ability to assess the quality of Foundations Associates’ treatment services, including services for co-occurring disorders.

Ex-offenders in the Nashville region being provided integrated ACT services.

FROM 2007 TO 2012, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT FUNDED THE PROJECT. PARTNERSHIP WITH THE PARK CENTER.

As part of the Nashville ACT Program, ACT is offered comprehensively to ex-offenders in the Nashville region who are co-occurring disorders and are at high risk of contracting HIV/AIDS. Such ex-offenders have a concurrent addiction, mental illness, and HIV/AIDS. They integrate Robert Drake and Kim Mueser’s evidence-based approaches for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment into comprehensive substance abuse mental health services. The CDC, NIDA, and SAMHSA will provide systematic HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment to those born with HIV.

In a Rural Community, an Evaluation of Integrated ACT Services was Conducted.

FROM 2002 TO 2005, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAT SPONSORED THE PROJECT. PARTNERSHIP WITH RIDGEVIEW PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL AND CENTER, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

In this project, the Assertive Community Team (ACT) model will be implemented to provide adequate comprehensive core care practices for individuals with severe and chronic mental illness who live in rural areas and have co-occurring disorders (Drake et al., 2001). Designed to accommodate the incredibly large number of people underserved by existing systems of care, this project aims to create a model that can be used to treat homeless people who have a mental illness along with drug abuse/dependency issues.

The Strengthening Families Model Being Adapted for Families with Co-occurring Disorders.

FROM 1999 TO 2002, HHS/SAMHSA/CSAP Sponsored THE PROJECT. TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES PARTNERSHIP

Incorporated into the Strengthening Families Initiative, the targeted preventive approach introduced in this particular project is called sustainability of the family program. In the particular case being studied, the Supervision Facilitation Protocol (SFP) was to be expanded so that, as a result of the project, it could be used not only by parents, but also by their children who have been diagnosed with mild to moderate psychopathology. SFP aims to reduce the effects of environmental risk factors to increase protective factors that will keep youth who are at high risk of drug abuse and bad behaviour from developing drug abuse and other problems.

Housing Within Reach: Designing, Enacting, and Enforcing Long-Term and Permanent Housing Options for Tennesseans Suffering from Mental Health.

Housing Within Reach: Designing, enacting, and enforcing long-term and permanent housing options for Tennesseans suffering from mental illness.

It has been predicted that this project would have a profound impact upon the housing choices available to Tennesseans with severe and chronic mental illnesses, causing a shift in the housing market for those with severe and chronic mental illnesses.

The Two Major Objectives of This Project Are:

  • To reduce the problem of homelessness among Tennesseans with mental illnesses by securing a resource system that provides access to quality, affordable and consumer-driven housing services, as well as to optimize the existing resource system,
  • The project’s goal is to significantly reduce the stigma associated with mental illness in the state of Tennessee and create a more welcoming environment for people who live in Tennessee neighborhoods, despite co-occurring disorders.

How You Can Get Help

Even though people who suffer from substance abuse disorders can benefit greatly from therapy, they still carry risks in their physical health and safety. When an individual is addicted to anger through any means, they can cause great damage in a matter of seconds. In order to prevent such situations from occurring, families cannot approach people like this without professional help. Generally, the conversation dynamics will not necessarily change in a matter of minutes, but without the help of a professional, anything could go wrong.

Having a trained interventionist who specializes in working with families to develop a greater understanding of anger can facilitate discussions that help alleviate the obsession with anger addiction. In addition, some of these professionals might adopt a friendly attitude towards the individual whose anger increases throughout the conversation. Those situations in which primary mediation will not work are those where anger addiction may cause upset. An interventionist will, in this case, discourage the angry person from inflicting further damage on themselves and others.

If it’s not too much hassle, call us on 615-490-9376 if you’re ready to begin this essential healing process. We can provide you with access to a variety of helpful resources that can help you find the right answer to your anger addiction issues as well as other co-occurring disorders.