Manic Depression and Self-Destruction

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Last Updated on May 16, 2021 by

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, can lead to complex and intense feelings, which can lead to self-destructive behavior.

Although bipolar disorder can negatively impact an individual’s health and life, self-injury, reckless decision-making, and self-destructive behaviors, support is available for patients with manic depression. Depression is a mood condition with a long, dark shadow on certain areas of life. Moods are emotional conditions that affect our psychological well-being. The majority of people go through mood swings. We feel satisfied with manic depression when we receive great results, a raise, or a love response from a lady or a man.

When we are rejected by a deadline, fail an exam, or experience financial setbacks, we feel down or depressed. It is normal and necessary to rejoice over positive events. It’s perfectly natural and acceptable to be overwhelmed in the face of adversity. The presence of a manic depression could occur if we did not feel down if in the face of catastrophic or deeply disappointing events or circumstances.

On the other hand, mood disorders entail mood swings that are exceptionally severe or long-lasting and negatively impact the individual’s ability to function at work or fulfil their daily duties manic depression. Even when things seem to be going well or witness slightly disturbing occurrences that others ignore, some people become seriously depressed. Others go through mood swings that are out of control. They experience an emotional roller coaster that makes them dizzy or makes them sad or depressed.

Depression costs about half as much as heart disease or diabetes in terms of money—the majority of people who have a major depressive episode never have another. Comparably, bipolar or mood swing disorders differ in severity; bipolar disorder is the more severe disorder, whereas cyclothymic disorder is the milder disorder (also called cyclothymia). The mood disturbance occurs in a single mental direction, usually in the negative direction, making depressive disorders known as unipolar disorders or manic depression.

Although bipolar disorder can negatively impact an individual’s health and life, self-injury, reckless decision-making, and self-destructive behaviors, support is available for patients with manic depression. Depression is a mood condition with a long, dark shadow on certain areas of life. Moods are emotional conditions that affect our psychological well-being. The majority of people go through mood swings.

When we receive great results, a raise, or a love response from a lady or man with depression, we feel satisfied with manic depression. When we are rejected by a deadline, fail an exam, or experience financial setbacks, we feel down or depressed. It is normal and necessary to rejoice over positive events. It’s perfectly natural and acceptable to be overwhelmed in the face of adversity. We could be in a manic depression if the wake of catastrophic events or deeply disappointing circumstances does not cause us distress, manic depression.

On the other hand, mood disorders entail mood swings that are exceptionally severe or long-lasting and negatively impact their ability to function at work or fulfil their daily duties manic depression. Even when things seem to be going well or witness slightly disturbing occurrences that others ignore, some people become seriously depressed. Others go through mood swings that are out of control.

They experience an emotional roller coaster that makes them dizzy or makes them sad or depressed. Depression costs about half as much as heart disease or diabetes in terms of money—the majority of people who have a major depressive episode never have another. Comparably, bipolar or mood swing disorders differ in severity; bipolar disorder is the more severe disorder, whereas cyclothymic disorder is the milder disorder (also called cyclothymia). The mood disturbance occurs in a single mental direction, usually in the negative direction, making depressive disorders known as unipolar disorders or manic depression.

Manic depression is one of the most difficult disorders to classify. Whether the bipolar I and bipolar II disorders represent two separate disorders, or merely different points on a bipolar disorder intensity scale, has yet to be answered. Except for major depression, bipolar I disorder tends to affect men and women similarly. Bipolar I disorder in men generally starts with a manic depression episode, while in women, it usually starts with a major depressive episode. The root cause of this gender imbalance has yet to be identified. Women tend to be more vulnerable to bipolar II disorder (APA, 2000).

The phenomenon of “rapid cycling” can develop in some cases when the person goes through two or three complete cycles of manic depression within a year, without any regular periods between them. Rapid cycling is rare, although it occurs more often in women than in men (Schneck et al., 2004). The only difference between it and manic depression is that it is shorter-lived and is often associated with more severe suicide attempts (Coryell et al., 2003; Schneck et al., 2004).

In certain cases, a trend of “rapid cycling” emerges, where the person goes through two or three complete cycles of mania and depression in a year with no regular periods in between. Rapid cycling is rare, but women are more likely than men to experience it (Schneck et al., 2004). A year or less is normal. However, it’s associated with an even more extreme form of manic depression (Coryell et al., 2003; Schneck et al., 2004).

Manic episodes are associated with poor decisions, argumentative behavior, and even violence, even harming property manic depression. They can irritate roommates, causing them to avoid them. They can become exceedingly generous, making significant charitable donations or giving away valuable things they cannot afford. Manic depression episodes are characterized by rapid-fire talk (pressured speech). Their thoughts and speech can jump from topic to topic in a rapid flight of ideas. Others have trouble getting a phrase in edgewise. They usually have an inflated sense of self-esteem, ranging from extreme self-confidence to grandiose delusions (Schulze et al., 2005).” They may find it difficult to sit still or sleep soundly.

Most of the time, you will be able to cut back on the need for sleep manic depression. They have a habit of waking up early but feeling well-rested and energized. They have been known to go for days without sleeping or feeling tired. However, they do not seem to be able to coordinate their efforts in a meaningful way in manic depression despite having so much energy.

Their joy makes it impossible for them to work and maintain stable relationships. People who are experiencing manic episodes tend to make bad decisions and fail to consider their behavior’s repercussions. Excessive spending, reckless driving, or sexual escapades can get them into trouble. They may have hallucinations in extreme cases. Alternatively, they can become seriously delusional, claiming, for example, that they have exclusive relationships with God, leading to manic depression.

Mania and Depression Signs

Manic depression is referred to as bipolar disorder in clinical terms. Often, bipolar disorder manifests itself in several different ways, but in most cases it manifests itself as episodes of mania accompanied by episodes of severe depression, known as manic depression.

Mania May Have a Detrimental Effect on Your Life by Triggering the Symptoms Mentioned Below:

  • Excessive euphoria that might feel good at first but can quickly lead to fatigue.
  • An inability to pay attention to important information even when doing things like driving a car or working 
  • Swings of extreme happiness or intense frustration that can alter rapidly
  • Consistently feeling nervous

The Following Are Some of The Signs of Depression:

  • Despair and hopelessness
  • Problems with relationships, jobs, and friendship
  • Disrupted feeding and sleeping habits 
  • Disrupted feeding and sleeping habits 
  • Suicidal ideation or thoughts that make you want to give up

It’s easy to see how bipolar disorder, also known as depressive mania can easily spiral out of control.

Destructive Decision Making and Bipolar Disorder

Manic depression is characterized by an overabundance of emotions that makes rational decision-making difficult. If bipolar disorder is not treated, there is a chance of making harmful decisions that may have long-term effects. Anger can lead to a violent outburst that is out of character. Depression that is so severe that a person leaves their job breaks ties with family and friends, or makes other poor choices can lead to manic depression.. Mania can lead to a rise in drug or alcohol use, extramarital affairs, impetuous spending and driving, and other harmful behaviors.

>>> READ THIS NEXT: What To Do When Your Loved One Has a Manic Episode

Self-Injury and Bipolar Disorder

Manic-depressives, who suffers from bipolar disorder, are also driven to seek comfort in any way possible to combat their manic depression. Some people fail to cope and hurt themselves to feel relief from the stress they’ve built up. It has been found that some bipolar individuals cut or burn themselves without caring about the effects to cause pain and damage the manic depression. Bipolar individuals are more likely than the general population to self-harm. Self-harm can lead to suicide by accident or serious injury in some cases.

Check out Manic Depression Treatment Now

You can receive care for your bipolar disorder today. We will assist you. We offer a toll-free help line that is a fully confidential resource that can assist you in finding a treatment center, talking to admissions staff, or obtaining assistance in numerous ways manic depression.. We will assist you in locating a program that meets your requirements, insurance coverage, and preferences. Please call  615-490-9376 right now to see if we can assist you on manic depression.

Sources

1 “Bipolar Disorder.” National Institute of Mental Health, April 2016.
2 Goldberg, Joseph, “Bipolar Disorder and Self-Injury.” Web MD, February 20, 2018.